Paradox of intolerance

Philosopher Karl Popper defined the paradox of intolerance in 1945 in The Open Society and Its Enemies Vol. 1.

Less well known is the paradox of tolerance: Unlimited tolerance must lead to the disappearance of tolerance. If we extend unlimited tolerance even to those who are intolerant, if we are not prepared to defend a tolerant society against the onslaught of the intolerant, then the tolerant will be destroyed, and tolerance with them.

Wretched of the screen > Hito Steyerl

 Now!

The poor image embodies the afterlife of many former masterpieces of cinema and video art. It has been expelled from the sheltered paradise that cinema seems to have once been.18 After being kicked out of the protected and often protectionist arena of national culture, discarded from commer- cial circulation, these works have become travelers in a digital no-man’s-land, constantly shifting their resolution and format, speed and media, sometimes even losing names and credits along the way.

Now many of these works are back—as poor images, I admit. One could of course argue that this is not the real thing, but then—please, anybody— show me this real thing.

The poor image is no longer about the real thing—the originary original. Instead, it is about its own real conditions of existence: about swarm circulation, digital dispersion, fractured and flexible temporalities. It is about defiance and appropria- tion just as it is about conformism and exploitation.

In short: it is about reality.

Jean-Luc Moulène

Jean Luc Moulène, Indexes, 2016, concrete, 138 x 74 x 50 cm. Courtesy: the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Jean Luc Moulène, Indexes, 2016, concrete, 138 x 74 x 50 cm. Courtesy: the artist, Thomas Dane Gallery, London, and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York

Jean-Luc Moulène, Fairy Fantasy, 2016, plastic, foam, wood, epoxy resin, 57 x 40 x 38 cm. Courtesy: the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; photograph: Florian Klienefenn

Jean-Luc Moulène, Fairy Fantasy, 2016, plastic, foam, wood, epoxy resin, 57 x 40 x 38 cm. Courtesy: the artist and Miguel Abreu Gallery, New York; photograph: Florian Klienefenn

SEEK

Nicholas Negroponte with the MIT Architecture Machine Group, SEEK, 1969-1970

Knots

They are playing a game. They are playing at not playing a game. If I show them I see they are, I shall break the rules and they will punish me. I must play their game, of not seeing I see the game.

A Restoration

One of the most intoxicating artworks I've seen this year is Elizabeth Price's A Restoration, at the Ashmolean Museum in Cambridge.

http://www.contemporaryartsociety.org/news/friday-dispatch-news/elizabeth-price-restoration-ashmolean-museum-oxford/

"I use digital video to try and explore the divergent forces that are at play when you bring so many different technological histories together... I’m interested in the medium of video as something you experience sensually as well as something you might recognise."

EP's 2008 At the house of Mr X is fantastic too. It's various sensual elements are expertly spliced to set hearts racing and leave you haunted.